2020 U.S. Elections are right around the corner. Get ready to vote!

Have questions about the voting process in North Carolina? Need to register to vote? Want to know more about voting by mail?

Support our work

Contribute today to help support NCAAT’s programs to build leadership in our communities.

Get involved

From voter registration drives to getting out the vote, NCAAT looks to its volunteers to help engage the community.

Come join us.

Stay connected

Keep in touch with our work and with our events, workshops and opportunities.

NCAAT in Action

NCAAT in Action mobilizes Asian Americans in North Carolina for action. Visit its website by clicking below.

Our Work

Youth Programs

Building a leadership pipeline

NCAAT works to empower, connect and provide personal and leadership development for
young Asian American Pacific Islanders. Our youth programs are open to youth of all ages and interests. We have paid opportunities, fellowships, internships and ways to engage.

Civic Engagement

Empowering community

Through voter registration and get out the vote efforts, NCAAT is setting out to tap into the power of the AAPI electorate and amplify voices from communities who often feel unheard or unrepresented. Together, we can collectively make our state more inclusive and representative of the communities here.

Community Programs

Connecting communities

By connecting our diverse AAPI communities, we empower one other. It’s because of this that NCAAT places in value in cross-ethnic an cross-racial dialogue and education. Through programs like film screenings and education workshops on history and identity, we can help build a stronger community.

Policy and Advocacy

Protecting each other

Beyond voting, as community members, we have the power to hold public officials accountable and protect each other. NCAAT helps to call attention to policies adverse to AAPI and immigrant communities and to help immigrants and refugees navigate the immigration system through naturalization workshops.

Latest Updates

Importance of Language Access

I am a first-generation Hmong-American due to the selflessness of my parents, who gave up everything that they knew in their homeland to immigrate to the United States, all for a better opportunity to provide for my siblings and me. For those who are unaware, the Hmong people are an ethnic minority within the Asian community, typically residing in Southeast Asia – my parents for example were born in Laos but lived in a refugee camp located in Thailand.

Read more

The iNCite Workshop Experience: Intergenerational Solidarity

I’ve always thought of myself as a creative person, but you wouldn’t know that if you’ve encountered me during my undergraduate years. My time spent at UNC-Chapel Hill has been consumed by a deep dive into service, student organizing, and becoming involved with various political and civic engagement-related initiatives. Over the past three years, any impulse to write a story or poem was pushed down for the sake of “productivity” — with studying, work, or meetings always taking precedent. As I head into my final year as an undergraduate, I’m realizing what a misstep ignoring my creative impulses was. Storytelling provides so much opportunity for both expression and advocacy. 

Read more